Australian Wind Alliance

New South Wales full of wind farm fans

State government survey shows majority of people in NSW support wind

A new survey has found communities across New South Wales remain big fans of wind farms.

A substantial 81 per cent of the 2000 people surveyed in the State Government-commissioned investigation said they support wind farms in the state.

It also found:

  • 91 per cent or respondents support the use of renewables to generate electricity in NSW,
  • there is a widely held view (83 per cent) that NSW should be producing more of its electricity from renewables, and 
  • people in NSW believe renewable energy provides both environmental and economic benefits 

 Australian Wind Alliance national co-ordinator Andrew Bray says he is not surprised that there is widespread support for wind energy.

 “There are huge economic benefits when you increase investment in wind energy. Wind farms create jobs and boost income in regional areas, on top of producing cheaper and cleaner power,” Mr Bray said.

 The Wind Alliance says it’s time for the New South Wales Government to give the people what they want by finalising planning guidelines that have been in draft form for almost five years.

 The latest data shows there are 24 wind projects in the investment pipeline, the majority of which are held up in the planning system.

 “New South Wales has a Renewable Energy Action Plan in place but confusion around wind farm planning guidelines is holding projects back,” Mr Bray said.

 “Greater sharing of direct financial benefits with landholders and their neighbours is an important way to ensure the whole community gains from having a wind farm in their region.

 “There are huge opportunities in New South Wales, which is lagging well behind the other states like South Australia when it comes to renewable energy generation.”

 Clean Energy Council reports show New South Wales only hosts five per cent of the total wind farms already built in Australia.

 “New South Wales has the lowest proportion of renewables of any state and with the largest annual greenhouse gas emissions of any jurisdiction it has an important leadership role in tackling climate change,” Mr Bray said.

 “Renewable energy is the solution, and wind is the cheapest new form of electricity generation – both in renewables and non-renewables.”


Be the first to comment